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. they ran away to the natchez-mississippi area, the territory. and lived together and later claimed they were married. campaign, it became a real issue and jackson never got over it because he said it ultimately. all her life, she was embarrassed by it. she was a pioneer woman, she a pipe, a corn cob pipe. and was a very excellent plantation manager. the public side of things, no. and she was very, very hurt by it. now, judge overton, the best riend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of the not being married because they did remarry. advised them to marry when jackson became famous and that tennessee. the whole detail. he gets up. goes to mississippi, to natchez. say, they were married. he wouldn't go any further than that. >> what did andrew jackson do the rest of his term? two terms, really? as far as the first lady? hostess? wife's niece for the second administration. he died in the second administration. she was popular. but she left over the flutter of the margaret o'neill scandal of very loose he -- a morals -- known for loose morals. he married a member of the th
of the rain stays east of the mississippi and more severe storms headed into the northeast on friday. and we get rid of everything on saturday. saturday looks better in the northeast. if you are going to jones beach and along the cape, 81 in boston. it will be nice for saturday. showers in the mid atlantic all the way back here along the mississippi. still dry across the west with the exception of areas across northern washington and northern montana. 83 in kansas city on sunday. we dry out in the nation's midsection. on monday we are looking at showers in arkansas, oklahoma, down in the southeast. still 78 in chicago. we're not shaking the cooler than average weather around the great lakes. 96 in salt lake city. wednesday looks quiet with the exception of the southeast. what's new? you can get the latest weather weekday mornings on wake up with al at 5:30. ♪ [ bats squealing ] we weren't really morning people. we're vampires after all. then we tried this nutri-grain fruit crunch bar. it's so crunchy. crunchy granola, mmmm... made with real fruit, 20 grams of whole grains. now, we love mor
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
. and some showers and thunderstorms from mississippi to virginia. also be some scattered showers in the northeast. >> mostly 80s across the midwest and northeast. 90s for much of the south. and dallas is the hot spot at 104 degrees. >>> heading towards extinction. the standard feature you may not see the next time you buy a new car. >>> and a town in shock. fresh questions about how a large snake killed two children while they slept. >>> also new this morning a delivery truck goes airborne. we're learning more about how this happened and the driver under arrest in connection with the crash. ♪ when you recognize something isn't right, he call to the vetera crisis line at 1-800-273-8255 and press 1. >>> president obama visiting phoenix today, to reach out to the middle class about home ownership. the president will propose overhauling the mortgage finance system. he wants to phase out fannie mae and freddie mac. it would replace private firms to secure mortgages while the government provides oversight and insurance. >>> new money is buying out a piece of the old media. jeff besoz
right. pull out, everybody. i'll let you watch. >> mississippi. 7 mississippi. fail. >> and in fact, the car flips over. >> oh, my gosh. >> can you believe this? the dash camera catches everything. rolls over on its side. and flips. apparently the translation in korean is great. roll it again. we'll just have some fun. but apparently the driving instructor says "brake, brake, brake!" [ bleep ], what do we do? what do we do? as the car starts turning over on its side. right about here. okay. >> oh, oh, oh. >> he says, what are you doing, don't know which gas pedal you are pressing! i'm going crazy! get out of this car! >> i could have done the translation from what she was doing. you can hear her go oh, oh, oh, oh. >> it sounds the same in any language, the expletive. doesn't it? >> oh, oh, oh. >> failed in seven seconds. worst driver ever! >> and over again. >>> here is a video you are going to want to watch. this one is great. group of young youtubers, true story asa team have posted a video of themselves, they usually -- they're pranksters. this time they changed up the tone. this
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
york, but i'm a mississippi girl. i like the braves. >> a view on a-rod, playing tonight. not playing well. but he has $175,000 after being exposed as a cheat. >> i think he could care less at this point. he's made a ton of money. set some records. he feel, ah, my legacy is set in other ways. i could care less what would michael have thought? not a lot, i suspect. >> jo think he was really at the top of michael's list of concerns in life. michael was believer in fairness and i don't think he would have approved of a-rod necessarily. >> were you surprised by the incredible outpouring of attention that michael's death got? the tributes and accolades that came? >> i think it's a real testament to his legacy and what he stood for, and you know, what a passionate supporter he was of liberty, of human rights, of freedom. of the right to free speech, and so i was definitely, it meant so much to me. all the lovely thing that people, and your tribute. thank you so much for that, too. >> an incredible force. a brave, courageous man. it's desperately sad. for us, everyone in the media and the vi
who don't know who emmett till is. a 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955 and flirted with a white woman and a few days later two white racists attacked him and shot him to death. now this is who she is comparing this to, trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand here. it was a big missed opportunity for oprah winfrey. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and to bring the country forward and add a little unity here. instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in oprah. >> that was an awesome chandelier. banned phrase. decimate. did we discuss this in the a block? i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree. he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every 10th man. so technically 90% of al-qaeda is still in operation. president obama is saying, yes, we have 10% and we have 90% left. that's all i want to do. >> technically that's what he meant. so stop using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
that stretched across texas, mississippi, alabama and georgia. david mattingly is "out front" on this story. hi, david. what did investigators find? >> well, first of all, they found 367 dogs. over 100 of them just in one single location. they have arrested ten men, seven of them came from the state of alabama. but this goes beyond just fighting dogs and the atrocities involved in that. they're looking at what they seized here in terms of money. they seized a half million dollars in this raid on friday that shows you just what big money is being had at these dogfighting operations. now, they also believe that some of these defendants may have been gambling as much as $200,000 on a single dogfight. again, showing you what kind of money was involved in these operations so doing much further than just dogfighting. they're also looking at illegal gambling operations and what sort of organizations might be out there associated with this. >> that is big money. what will happen to these dogs? >> well, right now, they're in emergency shelters. they're being cared for. they're getting medical treatment,
, mississippi, who has everybody fired up at just 5 years old, samuel green realized he had a special gift. >> three years later he's a veteran of the pulpit inspiring everyone who wants to listen wherever he goes. take a look. >> he had nothing. he lost his land. he lost his animals. he lost his sons and daughters. but do you know what jobe did? jobe fell to his knees an began worshiping god saying the lord has gave and the lord has taken away. blessed be the name of the lord. >> preaching it there, samuel. samuel is here with his mother and his mentor. welcome to everybody. >> hello. >> hi. >> you are just a bright light, aren't you sitting over there. >> yes. >> and even without those teeth. it's unbelievable. >> when you are up there preaching, are you just memorizing things? tell us what you are doing when you are up there. >> it's something i do every day stuff and i really don't forget it. i really don't get nervous because i know god has my back. >> god has your back. >> so are all your sermons about bible stories? >> well, yes. >> do you have a favorite one, like david and goliath
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
's the deal for those of you that don't know, 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955, flirted with a white woman. a few days later, two white racists attacked him, shot him to death. this is who she is comparing trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand. it was a missed opportunity. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and bring the country forward and add a little unity here. but instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in her. >> i will say that was an awesome chandelier. >>> banned phrase. decimate. we discussed it in a block. i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree, he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every tenth man. 90% of al qaeda is in operation because president obama says we have 10%, 90% left. >> that's technically what he meant. >> using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us not to use, we can't talk any more. >> i want to ban every single word. >> get out. throw to "special report." >> tha
of mississippi and represented to the lobbyist. so of course those companies contacted us and as jack abramoff did end haley barbour did and they wanted to see if their clients could get the foxcom contract or the lg see contact but i put up by the wayside. i was serious about the security of the capital. later when they kept getting complaints from members of congress not from haley barbour jack abramoff but members of congress to set i want to use myself. i called the nsa for national security agency and they came to my office and a private limit and i said tell me the living dead was involved in this. tell me what is the bottom line with this security aspect. they went ahead and they looked at this and we went to a room which was in the capital capital and that's a private room nothing bounces in and nothing bounces up and i won't reveal the information today. security in the capital but they said it's okay to do these if we do them this way. doesn't matter which company does them. the israeli-based company which in fact or the lgc american company it doesn't matter which one. if you do it
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
that will swim up, they have been known to swim up to mississippi river. most say it is the mouth of the bay. one thing you don't need to be concerned is getting attacked by a shark in chesapeake bay. there are parts of the world, chesapeake bay, they are uncommon there >> reporter: you don't need to worry about going in the bay? >> with the frequency, number of bull sharks going on, very infrequent, not going to be a problem. >> reporter: were you surprised? >> it happened in 2001. couple of fisherman, caught them, turned up at the mouth of the potomac. typically a couple every year. this is something going on. chesapeake bay is a highway of fish coming in from the ocean. they are there for food just like these sharks are coming for food. they are full of stipe bass. >> reporter: they are not hunting people? >> they are looking for fish. >> reporter: if you see one, what should you do? >> if you are at the beach and see a large shark, it would be in your best interest to go to the pool. >> reporter: i am with you. [laughter]. >> we have 16 species of sharks in the lower bay. bay is important for
, -- another one, holding a town hall this evening in mississippi -- he posts a picture on instagram of the folks coming into that town hall in mississippi. also this evening, john boehner is holding a conference call with republicans. politico reports on that. the headline -- they write the republican leadership hold a conference this evening. topics expected to be discussed include immigration reform legislation, government funding and the debt ceiling, and those issues are expected to be top priorities in the fall. they said conference calls of this nature are typical during long recesses. the house has been out of session for three weeks and does not return to washington until september 9. back to calls. caller: hi. my son is a student going to college. he is going to a private college. my husband and i are both middle-class americans. i am a teacher. the costs are daunting. by the time he is done with school completely, $250,000 in loans. he wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> right. caller: of course you when you talk to move ahead and break those barriers. we get a bill in t
this morning. sarah thomas, a mother of three from mississippi, on track now to become the first permanent, female nfl official. she's on the field right now, in fact, with new orleans saints, as they go through training camp, honing skills as she awaits that final word that her dreams will finally come true. in those bold black and white stripes, and hair tucked under that black hat, this official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch yourself right here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: but 39-year-old sarah thomas, a married mother of three, is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i'm a tomboy. yes, but i'm married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first-ever full-time female official for the national football league. >> there's momma. >> 72, you have to come move up on this. put your guard up. >> individually, i'm a female. there's a lot of things that set us apart individually. race, gender. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for almost 16 years of officiating grade school, high school and colleg
and how deep the movement is. it doesn't matter if it's in virginia, in mississippi, illinois, california, across this country, people are demanding comprehensive immigration reform and the end of the deportations and the destruction of our families. someone in the activity yesterday. i was in minneapolis st. paul. the church was full. it was full. but she bemoaned the fact that more people didn't come. she said they department come. some were tired, frustrated, and disillusioned. guess what? virginia is giving the example today. no one has the right to be tired or disillusioned. no one has the right to give up on this fight. today 1,200 people will be deported. children will be left without a mom or a dad, husband or a wife. the fear that permeates our community and the underclass exploited every day has to come to an end. you do not have the right to be tired. you have a responsibility to fight to make this a greater nation for all of us to live and va rah today is giving that example. thank you so much. [ speaking spanish ] we're going to win immigration reform because we have leaders
down to alabama and mississippi and tennessee to unionized those work places with the new german model. tracy: they want to have a decision team that sits on the company's board? it sounds crazy. >> also work councils and different groups like that and they say it works in germany but those jobs have moved from tennessee -- from germany to tennessee and their growth rate has them lower than ours even a we have not had a very good growth rate recently as 1.7% tracy: i understand the logic. they come to tennessee purposely because it is right to work not to do with the union nonsense but said the union thinks we can convince them otherwise? >> exactly also the auto companies and the south are adding workers nissan has 5,000 and one to add another 2,000. of they are expanding by at jeep is moving to new china for the export market not even expanding in ohio to one that is crazy but your point that membership has fallen with 11 percent of the work force in the unit is down from 20%. >> and only 6 percent of private-sector workers are in the union right ow. tracy: what is the incentive to
in mississippi -- on instagramcture of the folks coming into that town hall in mississippi. also this evening, john boehner is holding a conference call with republicans. politico reports on that. the headline -- they write the republican leadership hold a conference this evening. topics expected to be discussed include immigration reform legislation, government funding and the debt ceiling, and those issues are expected to be top priorities in the fall. they said conference calls of this nature are typical house has an out of session for three weeks. they will be back in session in september. pennsylvania, republican line. caller: hi. my son is a student going to college. he is going to a private college. my husband and i are both middle-class americans. i am a teacher. the costs are daunting. done withe he is inool completely, $250,000 loans. he wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> right. caller: of course you when you talk to move ahead and break those barriers. foret a bill in the mail 30,000 something dollars every few months. loans is he taking on himself and how much are you and your
over the mississippi river, 16 feet more to go. i could watch this go down the nation's greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents pennsylvania's ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. as i have traveled around the coeeg what other
in texas. heat advisories and heat warnings from mississippi up into arkansas, oklahoma, texas. it's not just the air temperature, but the feels like temperature, and it says it will feel like 108, and 107 in shreveport. but you get here in the 70s in new england. 60s in the up of michigan and on into northern minnesota. 90s interior sections of the pacific northwest. the two risk areas for severe weather both in the central plains and also upper midwest and the heat continues on into parts of new mexico. but gorgeous in los angeles today. sunshine, 75. >>> 7:34 on wednesday morning. cloudy start to the day over the go bridge. we have a lot of high and mid levelle clouds, not a lot of fog. updated all morning long. what is going to happen, we'll see the westerly flow, cool ocean air inland. enough of the wind so a fog isn't much of a factor even later tone when it rolls in. 58 degrees in san francisco. 72 in san jose 74 santa teresa. finally seasonal averages monday. >> al, thank you very much. this morning on rossen reports, a new crime targeting women at gas stations. thieves str
thomas, the mother of three from mississippi at the new orleans saints training camp as a referee. >> and she is a member of the league's referee training program in line for an official full-time job. "gma" anchor josh elliott has her story. >> here we go. >> reporter: in the bold black and white stripes and hair tucked under that plaque hat, the official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch your step here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: 39-year-old sarah thomas, married mother of three is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i am a tomboy, yes. but i am married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first ever full time female official for the national football league. >> where's mama? >> 72, you've got to move up on those pass plays. put your guard up. put your guard up. individually, i am a female. a lot of things set us apart. race, gender, different background. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for 15 years, on fir -- officiating grade school, high school, and college games. discovered b
in mississippi. an instructor and student made a jump saturday and disappeared. they were found hours later in a remote swamp. >>> a new picture of n.s.a. leaker edward snowden leaving russia. he was granted temporary asylum and is leaving with other ex-patriots. this while president obama says he will not meet with russian president putin for a one on one unless the situation changes. thoeup -- >>tucker: a scene out of a cops and robber movies. swat members stormed an animal shelter to shoot and kill gill -- giggles. >>steve: was it necessary to kill giggles or is this an example of excessive force in a government gone wild? ray shelby was taking care of giggles and witnessed the incident. he joins us live from chicago. good morning to you. >> good morning. >>steve: why did you have this white-tailed deer at the shelter? apparently you do need to have permits. otherwise it's illegal to keep him. >> a family from illinois brought the deer up because they were -- the deer had been in their backyard for like three days, and they didn't see the mother, so they knew we were there. the shelter i
martin is the 14-year-old black belt that was assassinated in the middle of mississippi in 1985 for allegedly violating racial etiquette and speaking to a white woman. his body was placed in the tallahassee river with a 125 lb coffin jindal tied around his neck. it was shown in the jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our dhaka see. we think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from the jail. dr. king says the activism that has gone on the end of the young women and men in that are being addressed it sometimes as eight, naim, 10-years-old are taking the nation back to the democracy that was dug deep by the founding fathers. he was being too kind because the country was founded on racial slavery and it is a conversation that we still have not had. about 50 years ago with the march on washington provided a litmus test for democracy. when he speaks of the march on washington she says americans of all cultures and races have to struggle together and go to jail together to try to funda
direction. florida, georgia, michigan, mississippi. these are states that have been difficult to target. i think over time you want to see how the numbers do. the concern for some time is these children had about a five-time likelihood of growing up to be obese adults as well. the problem is coming. this is the first time we have seen sustained improvement. >> the states are all over the country. it's not concentrated in one region at all. is there a reason, a cause for h this drop at this point? >> we're not entirely sure. we asked the same question. >> of course. >> i would say this is the kitchen sink mentality. the obesity epidemic, throw everything at the problem to see what sticks. that was good probably. the hard part is trying to figure out what worked. one clue is ta the low income children being affected points to federal subsidy programs as a possible cause, a benefit. wic and food stamp programs have regulated what people can buy to eat. much more healthy buying going on. decrease ing sugary drinks. also breastfeeding. there is a sustained effort. it makes a difference. childre
, mike. >> fremont festival, biggest outdoor festival west of the mississippi. over here, biggest pain on the east bay area, the bay bridge toll plaza. the cash rains are all backed up, the fast track lanes, big advantage, get a fast track transresponder in the possibility of that strike on monday as well with b.a.r.t. shut down. look toward the eastshore freeway, traffic lighter, no problems on the berkeley curve, merge with folks off of 580, that you have slowing, the map shows the slow downs in the area, not so bad, ashby avenue the worst and 2r5d digsal any time of clay, you go, through downtown berkeley, nice smooth flow off the berkeley curve and take you to westbound highway 4, still slow in antioch and a crash that's clearing. back to you, janelle. >> thanks so much, mike. thanks for joining us. see you in a half an hour. ♪ >>> welcome back. >> what is that song? >> wow. >> you like it? >> yeah, sure. >> there's a best in the world. >> of course they are popular. but when you were a kid there were poppy bands that you listened to. >> that's true. >> new kids. >> new kids. >>
't mississippi and it wasn't alabama and you can see that even today, certainly there were racial and ethnic tensions but they were not so universal that interracial cooperation was rendered impossible. >> the belief is fading that answers can be found and we're losing the will to search for it. >> reporter: the war effort ended, the car business slowed. factories left for the suburbs and other states. sprawling neighborhoods began to empty. it was to the long before the hundreds of to you sands of people who transformed this city were suddenly nowhere to be found. >> so where do we go from here? how did we get here? we're going to look at that but also as we were driving in yesterday, noticed all the blithed buildings, so much work to be done in this city, but also so many positive things happening and so many beautiful aspects of this city's legacy that we're going to be talking about this morning straight ahead. >> mike, this has been happening slowly. you know, you can see it when you came here in the '70s. remember 1980 i think it was, they had the super bowl here. my god, that was 30 s
on into the upper mississippi river valley. sunny and hot from the gulf coast to the northwest. rain leftover in new england. saturday, kind of wet through the ohio river valley back into the plains. west coast looking fabulous again. sizzling in texas. sunday, sunday, more rain in the mid-atlantic states. the heat continues out west. and a few >>> 9:33. we do havess an overcast sky ov the bay bridge but the golden gate completely clear. show you san jose. a nice, hazy sky here, lots of blue overhead. we have a beautiful day shaping up. the wind is the reason why. even though we have got a nice clear sky in san jose, that cool ocean air is going to continue to move all the way inland. keep our temperatures really comfortable. that means we are expecting 80 inland, 72, bay side, 63 at the coast, today, finally warm up to seasonal averages. >> that's your latest weather. carson? >> i'm going to build something now. thank you, al. >>> are you a weekend warrior who loves to take on new projects? is we've got cool ideas for you that should help you spruce up your home. >> kevin o'connor of this old house
. the author of several historical novels he spoke from the more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson this time more so than in the weather is what took place about 40 miles west of here which is what i want to talk about tonight at vicksburg. i mean, this is quite a story and it is a story that some people around here don't know. that is great fun for me, but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention. whenever i am doing in the event like this, i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason because some time many years ago you wrote a book called the killer angels. every time i say that people not there had. if you have no idea what that is , that's okay. is not required. we will explain it to you. threatened by my father, cannot in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now, with the killer angels' is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. this is not a history book will. it's a story as told to you from the characters themselves. the people is decisions
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